Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

ReliefWeb - Updates
    0 0

    Source: ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, Welthungerhilfe, ACTED, Malteser, International Commission of Jurists, Norwegian Refugee Council, CARE, Christian Aid, Mercy Corps, Action Contre la Faim France, People in Need, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, Save the Children, Plan International, World Vision
    Country: Bangladesh, Myanmar

    As the UN Security Council meets in New York to mark one year since nearly 700,000 Rohingya refugees fled to neighboring Bangladesh, International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs) working in Myanmar say 600,000 Rohingya still left in Myanmar face daily discrimination and human rights abuses, making conditions unsafe for refugees to return. INGOs urge the Security Council to use the one-year anniversary as an opportunity to step up pressure on the government of Myanmar to take action on three critical areas: addressing the root causes of the crisis in Rakhine State; ensuring accountability for human rights violations and improving humanitarian access.

    Discriminatory policies mean that Rohingya communities in Rakhine State continue to lack citizenship and face restrictions on their freedom of movement, impeding their ability to go to school, seek medical care, find jobs or visit friends and family. 128,000 Rohingya and other Muslim communities remain trapped in closed camps in central Rakhine for the sixth year since the intercommunal violence of 2012. Although some steps have been taken to relocate camp residents to new sites, the displaced communities have not been adequately consulted, are unable to return to their original homes, or another location of their choice, and continue to lack freedom of movement, access to jobs and services, thus further entrenching their confinement and segregation.

    At the same time, a full and independent international investigation into human rights violations – sexual violence, killings, beatings and destruction of homes and properties – that caused refugees to flee has not happened and the perpetrators who facilitated these abuses have not been brought to justice. The rights violations committed in Rakhine State are part of a pattern of ongoing military abuses against ethnic minorities throughout Myanmar, including in Kachin State, Shan State and the southeast of the country.

    Humanitarian organizations working throughout Rakhine State continue to face serious restrictions on their access to affected communities and bureaucratic and administrative barriers hamper their ability to carry out their daily work. In northern Rakhine, from where the majority of refugees in Bangladesh fled, full humanitarian access for most organizations has not been restored more than one year since restrictions were first put in place. Although a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between UNHCR, UNDP and the Government of Myanmar in June with a view to enabling both agencies to resume operations in northern Rakhine, they still await full, unfettered access, and have not yet been able to begin the work of supporting affected communities and monitoring conditions.

    The recommendations of the Kofi Annan-led Advisory Commission on Rakhine, published one year ago, provide the best roadmap for addressing the root causes of the crisis in Rakhine State, improving the lives of all communities and creating the conditions for an inclusive, fair and prosperous society for all the people in Rakhine. INGOs welcome the progress made by the Government of Myanmar in implementing some of the recommendations, including those related to improving development and infrastructure, such as building new roads, schools, and hospitals, but conclude that not enough progress has been made in addressing structural human rights issues or in creating an environment where all communities can benefit from these developments without discrimination. Without citizenship rights and freedom of movement, Rohingya communities in Rakhine State cannot equally benefit from improved development and refugees in Bangladesh will not feel safe to return.

    INGOs call on the UN Security Council to set time-bound and measurable targets for the Government of Myanmar to make meaningful progress in all three of these areas and to hold regular public meetings on the crisis.

    Specifically, the Security Council should call on the Government of Myanmar to implement the recommendations of the Advisory Commission in their entirety, including addressing structural problems of discrimination, restrictions on movement and denial of citizenship faced by Rohingya communities. Implementation of the Advisory Commission recommendations also requires listening to the perspectives of all ethnic groups in Rakhine in an effort to break down the divisions that have pitted communities against each other.

    Second, the Security Council should request the government of Myanmar to grant full and unfettered access for humanitarian organizations to all parts of Rakhine State as well as full access for independent media and journalists.

    And finally, it should step up efforts with the government of Myanmar to allow independent human rights investigators full and unimpeded access to investigate human rights abuses, gather untampered evidence and refer cases to an international tribunal. The Security Council must send a strong message to the Government of Myanmar to end impunity and prevent future violations.

    Unless these measures are implemented, the international community risks perpetuating impunity and cementing segregation in Rakhine State for decades to come.

    ACTED
    Action Aid Myanmar Action Contre La Faim
    Care International
    Christian Aid
    Consortium of Dutch NGOs
    Danish Refugee Council
    International Commission of Jurists
    International Rescue Committee
    Malteser International
    Medecins du Monde
    Mercy Corps
    Norwegian Refugee Council
    Oxfam International
    People in Need
    Plan International
    Save the Children International
    Solidarites International
    Welthungerhilfe
    World Vision International


    0 0

    Source: Concern Worldwide, HELP - Hilfe zur Selbsthilfe e.V., Catholic Relief Services, ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, GOAL, Welthungerhilfe, COOPI - Cooperazione Internazionale, ACTED, Helen Keller International, Malteser, ZOA, International Alert, Tearfund, CARE, International Aid Services, Christian Aid, Mercy Corps, Action Against Hunger USA, Mines Advisory Group, Solidarités International, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, CBM, Save the Children, Plan International, SOS Children's Villages International, World Vision, Secours Islamique France, International Emergency and Development Aid, Première Urgence Internationale, Street Child
    Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

    With the crisis entering its ninth year and showing no signs of abating despite recent efforts, 10.7 million people continue to be in urgent need of life-saving assistance across north-east Nigeria, far-north Cameroon, Western Chad and south-east Niger. Nearly 2.4 million people are displaced with fresh waves of violence and human rights abuses resulting in thousands arriving into congested sites on a weekly basis. Destruction of infrastructure and limited access to basic services due to insecurity have resulted in people having limited or no access to food, water, shelter, health, education and protection leaving them dependent on aid and in need of assistance to rebuild their communities and their ability to provide for their families.

    Political attention must remain focused on the ongoing crisis in the Lake Chad Basin. Despite efforts to date, the level of acute emergency needs continues to exceed available resources. Renewed support is needed to empower affected communities as agents of their own change and build on existing coping mechanisms. In order to bend the vulnerability curve and bring communities on to the path of sustainable development, community led resilience and development-orientated activities need to be scaled up in parallel to urgent life-saving assistance.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, ACTED, ZOA, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, INTERSOS, Mercy Corps, Action Against Hunger USA, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, Relief International, Save the Children, Global Communities
    Country: Yemen

    Humanitarian organisations operating in Yemen strongly support and welcome the consultation meeting in Geneva as a first step being taken by parties to the conflict towards a political resolution.

    As INGOs working in Yemen, every day we witness the devastating impact of the conflict on the lives of ordinary people, and the deteriorating humanitarian situation.

    Save the Children's Yemen Country Director Tamer Kirolos said it was time to put an end to the suffering of millions of Yemeni children and their families.

    “For close to four years, the children of Yemen have been subjected to violations of their rights from all parties to this conflict. It’s time to put aside strategic and political ambition and consider the future of this country – the children whose lives have until this point been so recklessly treated."

    Liny Suharlim, Country Director of ACTED said the international community must do its all to ensure the people of Yemen were protected from further violence and hardship.

    “Conditions in Yemen are dire with more than two million people displaced from their homes, and more than eight million not knowing where their next meal will come from. Meanwhile, we remain fearful of another wave of cholera sweeping through the population with devastating effects. The humanitarian assistance we provide is a critical stopgap within a catastrophe that will only be curbed with the implementation of an inclusive and just political solution.”

    A commitment from parties to the conflict to engage in an inclusive political process is now absolutely critical. The voices of women, youth and civil society are indispensable to have the needs of all parts of Yemeni society addressed. Peace in Yemen is the only way forward.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, ACTED, ZOA, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, INTERSOS, CARE, Saferworld, Mercy Corps, Handicap International - Humanity & Inclusion, Médecins du Monde, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, Relief International, Save the Children, Global Communities
    Country: Yemen

    INGOs working in Yemen are extremely worried about the new escalation of fighting in Hodeidah and the closure of key routes between Hodeidah city and the north and east of the country. The humanitarian catastrophe that has been unfolding in al-Durayhimi and the south of Hodeidah governorate will likely spread to the rest of the governorate and trigger another wave of internally displaced persons. Nearly 470,000 people have already fled Hodeidah since June, fearing for their lives amidst airstrikes and fighting on the ground.
    Audrey Crawford, DRC’s Country Director in Yemen says: “We are equally worried about the likely closure of the port of Hodeidah, through which 70% of supplies are shipped. With rates of malnutrition and disease running high, the port is a vital lifeline for millions of Yemenis who are dependent on aid.” “Given the currency crisis and rapid increase of prices even for the most basic food supplies, the closure of the port, as well as transport routes from Hodeidah to other parts of the country, would have a devastating impact on the 17.8 million people in Yemen who are food insecure,” states Ephraim Palmero, Country Director of ADRA in Yemen. “This could lead to widespread famine.” We urge all parties to the conflict to immediately stop the fighting in and around Hodeidah, and convene for consultations under the guidance of UNSE Martin Griffiths. There is no military solution to this war; the first step towards finding a political solution to the conflict must be taken now to protect the people of Yemen. Fighting and violence have devastating humanitarian consequences: displacement, disease, hunger and death, with children being amongst the most vulnerable to all of these. The people of Yemen cannot wait any longer for peace.

    ENDS


    0 0

    Source: ACTED, Norwegian Church Aid, Norwegian Refugee Council, Mercy Corps, Médecins du Monde, International Rescue Committee, International Emergency and Development Aid
    Country: Mali

    International NGOs working in Menaka seek to prevent further destabilization and improve the safety and security of the population and humanitarian workers

    Bamako, Mali– We, the international NGOs working in Menaka, would like to bring attention to the persistence of insecurity in the city of Menaka, which impacts both the area’s population as well as NGO staff. Since the beginning of 2018, at least 28 incidents have targeted NGO staff in the Menaka region, making it one of the most dangerous areas for us to work in Mali.

    These incidents have continued without improvement; the city of Menaka’s population and national NGO staff who work in the area remain targets of armed and violent robberies at night despite the resumption of security patrols. There are countless traders whose stores have been looted, individuals whose houses have been broken into, and NGO staff who have been assaulted.

    Despite consulting with local leaders, recurrently raising the issues with decision-makers, and advocating to local and international organizations, we feel that our voices are not being heard.

    The purpose of patrols is to dissuade thieves; however, they have not prevented attacks and do not have the geographical reach to effectively counteract insecurity. Additionally, the continued mass circulation of weapons and presence of armed groups throughout the city of Menaka can be explained by the delayed pace of the Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) process.

    Finally, Menaka’s courthouse is not yet functional, which may contribute to a feeling of impunity among criminals. This is exemplified by instances where thieves bring ladders to the houses of their intended targets for ease of access and where they do not seem rushed to carry out their actions.

    The people of Menaka and our colleagues live in constant fear and anxiety of the time when their homes will be broken into and robbed. It is therefore urgent to bring back security to the city of Menaka, for its inhabitants as well as for its NGO workers. This must occur before irreversible damage is caused, such as serious injury or death, where the absence of a strong security response drives NGOs out of the city of Menaka.

    We, the NGOs of Menaka, thus call on all leaders and decision-makers, to quickly find and commit to a solution and consequently act upon these commitments to foster a safer and more peaceful environment for all.


    0 0

    Source: ACTED, Norwegian Church Aid, Norwegian Refugee Council, Mercy Corps, Médecins du Monde, International Rescue Committee, International Emergency and Development Aid
    Country: Mali

    Bamako, le 29 octobre 2018 - Nous, coordination des ONG Internationales opérant à Ménaka, constatons avec regret la persistance de l’insécurité dans la ville de Ménaka, qui affecte autant les populations que les agents des ONG. Depuis le début de l’année 2018, pas moins de 28 incidents ont affecté le personnel d’ONG pour la région de Ménaka, ce qui en fait actuellement l’une des régions les plus dangereuses du Mali pour les ONG.

    Le constat est donc malheureusement sans appel, la population de la ville de Ménaka et le personnel des ONG qui y travaillent sont ciblés par des bandits armés commettant des braquages violents, la nuit et ce malgré la reprise des patrouilles. On ne compte plus les boutiques des commerçants de Ménaka pillées, ni les habitations des particuliers visitées, ou les agents d’ONG brutalisés.

    Malgré les nombreuses concertations avec les leaders locaux, des alertes répétées auprès de bien des décideurs, un plaidoyer constant auprès des entités locales et internationales, des communiqués de presse, nous avons la sensation que notre voix peine à trouver un écho favorable. En effet les patrouilles sensées arrêter les violences et dissuader les voleurs d’opérer n’ont pas l’impact attendu et ne permettent pas d’avoir une large couverture pour lutter contre l’insécurité. Le processus de Désarmement, Démobilisation, Réinsertion (DDR) semble tarder à se matérialiser, ce qui ne permet pas une diminution des armes circulant en masse, et explique la présence de combattants issus de nombreuses mouvances dans la ville de Ménaka.

    Enfin, le tribunal de Ménaka n’est toujours pas fonctionnel, exacerbant le sentiment d’impunité des malfrats qui est tel qu’ils se permettent de transporter des échelles dans la ville pour mieux pénétrer dans l’enceinte de leurs futures victimes, n’hésitant pas à rester beaucoup de temps sur les lieux des braquages, avant de repartir sans être jamais inquiétés. La peur et le stress s’emparent de plus en plus de la population et de nos collèguestravailleurs des ONG sur Ménaka qui ne peuvent dormir la nuit sans appréhender le moment où des malfrats viendront les dévaliser.

    Il apparait donc urgent de ramener la sécurité dans la ville de Ménaka pour ses habitants comme ses travailleurs des ONG, et ce avant que l’irrémédiable ne soit commis, que la ou les prochaines victimes ne soient gravement blessées ou tuées et finalement que l’absence de réponse appropriée devienne une menace sérieuse à la présence des ONG dans la ville de Ménaka.

    Nous ONG de Ménaka, en appelons donc à tousles leaders et décideurs, pour qu’une solution soit rapidement trouvée avec des engagements fermes, suivis d’actions qui favorisent un environnement de travail plus apaisé et moins risqué pour tous.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, ACTED, War Child International, ZOA, Norwegian Refugee Council, INTERSOS, CARE, Handicap International - Humanity & Inclusion, Aide Médicale Internationale, Action Against Hunger USA, International Rescue Committee, Relief International, Save the Children
    Country: Yemen

    International non-government organisations (INGOs) in Yemen are appalled by the renewed increase in intensity of hostilities in and around Hodeidah city. After calls for a ceasefire by the international community only a matter of days ago this is a deeply disturbing development. All parties to the conflict must immediately stop the violence considering the catastrophic impact of this fighting on the civilians of Hodeidah and across Yemen.

    Civilian infrastructure and housing is being occupied by armed forces, and health facilities have come under major threat, not only endangering the lives of staff and patients but further limiting the accessibility of health services. The use of civilians as human shields is a major breach of International Humanitarian Law calling for immediate investigation.

    Most routes out of Hodeidah are now blocked by fighting, severely impeding humanitarian agencies’ ability to transport aid and supplies to those in need across Yemen, and preventing residents from fleeing to safety. Over 70% of the country’s supplies come through Hodeidah and it is crucial that these routes are kept open to ensure the safe passage of aid to the millions who depend upon it for their survival.

    As an urgent priority, civilians and children in particular in and around Hodeidah must be protected from the direct and indirect impact of the fighting. We call for an immediate end to the current hostilities and urge parties to the conflict to engage with peace talks led by the UN Special Envoy Martin Griffiths. We call on the UN Security Council to adopt an unequivocal Resolution allowing the Special Envoy to put a stop to this violence and to the suffering of the countless millions who have already lost their lives and livelihoods.

    ENDS


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International, ACTED, War Child International, ZOA, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, INTERSOS, Tearfund, Mercy Corps, Handicap International - Humanity & Inclusion, Action Against Hunger USA, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, Relief International, Save the Children, Global Communities
    Country: Yemen

    International NGOs working in Yemen welcome the upcoming political consultations in Sweden. After almost four years of conflict in Yemen, up to 14 million people – 50 per cent of Yemen’s population - do not know where their next meal will come from. An estimated 85,000 children under five are presumed to have died from extreme hunger or disease since 2015.

    The magnitude of the ongoing conflict in Yemen and its humanitarian toll has led to the world’s largest humanitarian crisis. Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock warned of the urgent risk of a massive famine in a recent UN Security Council briefing and suggested five urgent steps to offset this catastrophe. Chief among these steps is ending the ongoing violence throughout the country, and removing obstacles to imports and domestic distribution of essential goods to avoid a full-fledged famine.

    We strongly hope that these consultations are the first step towards a peace process that will help put an end to the violence and dramatic food and health crises in Yemen and will lead to positive developments for the people of Yemen.

    ENDS


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le RRM est un mécanisme de réponse rapide, intégré au cadre humanitaire tel que défini dans l’objectif N°2 stratégique du HRP. Le mécanisme vise en priorité l’amélioration des conditions de vie des populations affectées par un mouvement de population suite à un choc (conflit armé) ou des catastrophes naturelles, mais aussi celles des populations affectées par des épidémies. Le mécanisme intervient pour répondre aux vulnérabilités les plus aiguës dans des zones d’accès difficile (physique,sécuritaire) et/ou dans des zones caractérisées par l’abscence d’acteurs humanitaires.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objective du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les hasards naturelles ou bien les épidémies.

    Délais d’intervention

    Le seuil de déclenchement du RRM:

    Dans le cadre des mouvements de populations, le seuil de déclenchement du RRM est fixé à 50 ménages (sauf cas exceptionnels) et se base sur les informations obtenues lors de l’alerte, vérifiées et validées par les partenaires. Si le seuil est inférieur à 50 ménages, une intervention sera considérée sur la base des capacités disponibles.

    Les délais actuels:

    Pour la région de Diffa la moyenne des délais entre les chocs et les débuts des interventions (19 jours) est au-delà de 7 jours de délai visé. Le retard rapporté est dû à une suspension des mouvements sur le département de Nguigmi pour des contraintes relatives à la Sécurité, par contre les délais sont respectés lorsque la situation sécuritaire le permet, comme cela a été le cas de Chétimari.

    En ce qui concerne Tahoua et Tillabéry les délais accumulés (121 et 30 Jours, respectivement) sont dus à plusieurs facteurs, entre autres, l’accès sécuritaire aux zones classées rouges par les autorités militaires (recommandant une escorte pour s'y rendre), les opérations militaires, les blocages d’accès aux zones d'installation des déplacés aux risques d’infiltrations des membres des groupes armés non étatique parmi les déplacés. Les actions de plaidoyer engagées par les membres du consortium à travers OCHA, la coordination civilo-Militaire (CIMCoord ) et le Ministère de l'Action Humanitaire ont permis la mise en place de corridors humanitaires permettant d’acceder à certaines zones ainsi que la reduction des délais pour organiser les Evaluations/Interventions. Néamoins certaines localités demeurent inaccessibles.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le RRM est un mécanisme de réponse rapide, intégré au cadre humanitaire tel que défini dans l’objectif N°2 stratégique du HRP. Le mécanisme vise en priorité l’amélioration des conditions de vie des populations affectées par un mouvement de population suite à un choc (conflit armé) ou des catastrophes naturelles, mais aussi celles des populations affectées par des épidémies. Le mécanisme intervient pour répondre aux vulnérabilités les plus aiguës dans des zones d’accès difficile (physique,sécuritaire) et/ou dans des zones caractérisées par l’abscence d’acteurs humanitaires.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objective du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les hasards naturelles ou bien les épidémies.

    Délais d'intervention

    Le seuil de déclenchement du RRM:

    Dans le cadre des mouvements de populations, le seuil de déclenchement du RRM est fixé à 50 ménages (sauf cas exceptionnels) et se base sur les informations obtenues lors de l’alerte, vérifiées et validées par les partenaires. Si le seuil est inférieur à 50 ménages, une intervention sera considérée sur la base des capacités disponibles.

    Les délais actuels:

    Pour la région de Diffa la moyenne des délais entre les chocs et les débuts des interventions (18 jours) est au-delà de 7 jours de délai visé. Le retard rapporté est dû à une suspension des mouvements sur le département de Nguigmi pour des contraintes relatives à la Sécurité, par contre les délais sont respectés lorsque la situation sécuritaire le permet, comme cela a été le cas de Chétimari.

    En ce qui concerne Tahoua et Tillabéry les délais accumulés (121 et 30 Jours, respectivement) sont dus à plusieurs facteurs, entre autres, l’accès sécuritaire aux zones classées rouges par les autorités militaires (recommandant une escorte pour s'y rendre), les opérations militaires, les blocages d’accès aux zones d'installation des déplacés aux risques d’infiltrations des membres des groupes armés non étatique parmi les déplacés. Les actions de plaidoyer engagées par les membres du consortium à travers OCHA, la coordination civilo-Militaire (CIMCoord ) et le Ministère de l'Action Humanitaire ont permis la mise en place de corridors humanitaires permettant d’acceder à certaines zones ainsi que la reduction des délais pour organiser les Evaluations/Interventions. Néamoins certaines localités demeurent inaccessibles.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le RRM est un mécanisme de réponse rapide, intégré au cadre humanitaire tel que défini dans l’objectif N°2 stratégique du HRP. Le mécanisme vise en priorité l’amélioration des conditions de vie des populations affectées par un mouvement de population suite à un choc (conflit armé) ou des catastrophes naturelles, mais aussi celles des populations affectées par des épidémies. Le mécanisme intervient pour répondre aux vulnérabilités les plus aiguës dans des zones d’accès difficile (physique,sécuritaire) et/ou dans des zones caractérisées par l’abscence d’acteurs humanitaires.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objective du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conffits armés, les hasards naturelles ou bien les épidémies.

    Délais d'intervention

    Le seuil de déclenchement du RRM:
    Dans le cadre des mouvements de populations, le seuil de déclenchement du RRM est fixé à 50 ménages (sauf cas exceptionnels) et se base sur les informations obtenues lors de l’alerte, vérifiées et validées par les partenaires. Si le seuil est inférieur à 50 ménages, une intervention sera considérée sur la base des capacités disponibles.

    Les délais actuels:
    Pour la région de Diffa la moyenne des délais entre les chocs et les débuts des interventions (6 jours) est inférieure aux 7 jours de délai visé. Toutefois, ce n'est pas le cas à Tillabéry où les délais accumulés (19 jours) sont au-delà de 7 jours de délai visé. Les retards constatés sont dus à plusieurs facteurs, entre autres, des pénuries de stock liées aux dispositions logistiques notamment au cours du mois de décembre, l’accès sécuritaire aux zones classées rouges par les autorités militaires (recommandant une escorte pour s'y rendre) et les opérations militaires. Quant à la région de Tahoua le dépassement de délais observés (121 jours) supérieures aux 7 jours de délai visé a été causé par des facteurs similaires à Tillabéry. De plus, d’autres facteurs comme le manque de ressources humaines dédiées, les besoins informationnels dans les délais, la fiabilité de système de points focaux et les blocages occasionnels d’accès aux zones d'installation des déplacés ont impacté sur les delais de réponses.
    Les actions de plaidoyer engagées par les membres du consortium à travers OCHA, la coordination civilo-militaire (CIMCoord) et le Ministère de l'Action Humanitaire ont permis la mise en place de corridors humanitaires permettant d’accéder à certaines zones ainsi que la réduction des délais pour organiser les évaluations/interventions. Néanmoins certaines localités demeurent inaccessibles.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objectif du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les catatastrophes naturelles ou les épidémies.

    Délais d’intervention

    Le seuil de déclenchement du RRM:
    Dans le cadre des mouvements de populations, le seuil de déclenchement du RRM est fixé à 50 ménages (sauf cas exceptionnels) et se base sur les informations obtenues lors de l’alerte, vérifiées et validées par les partenaires. Si le seuil est inférieur à 50 ménages, une intervention sera considérée sur la base des capacités disponibles.

    Les délais actuels:

    En début 2019 les retards continuent à se produire dans la région de Diffa et Tillaberi (18 et 28 Jours, respectivement); 35% de ces retards sont dus aux pénuries de stock liées aux dispositions logistiques. Les autres raisons tiennent à l’accès sécuritaire aux nouvelles zones classées rouges par les autorités militaires (recommandant une escorte pour s'y rendre) et les opérations militaires. Quant à la région de Tahoua le dépassement de délais observés (24 jours) a été causé par des facteurs similaires à ceux de Diffa et Tillabéry. De plus, d’autres facteurs comme le manque de ressources humaines dédiées, la diffusion parfois en retard des rapports des évaluations, la fiabilité de système de points focaux et les blocages occasionnels d’accès aux zones installation des déplacés continuent aussi à influencer sur les délais de réponses pour environ 70%.
    Les actions de plaidoyer engagées par les membres du consortium à travers OCHA, la coordination civilo-militaire (CIMCoord) et le Ministère de l'Action Humanitaire ont permis la mise en place de corridors humanitaires permettant d’accéder à certaines zones ainsi que la réduction des délais pour organiser les évaluations/interventions. Néanmoins certaines localités demeurent inaccessibles.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionne- ment des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humani- taire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objectif du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les catatastrophes naturelles ou les épidémies.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objectif du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les catatastrophes naturelles ou les épidémies.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Against Hunger USA, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objective du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les catastrophes naturelles ou bie

    Délais d’intervention

    Le seuil de déclenchement du RRM:

    Dans le cadre des mouvements de populations, le seuil de déclenchement du RRM est fixé à 50 ménages (sauf cas exceptionnels) et se base sur les informations obtenues lors de l’alerte, vérifiées et validées par les partenaires. Si le seuil est inférieur à 50 ménages, une intervention sera considérée sur la base des capacités disponibles.

    Les délais actuels:

    En début 2019 les retards continuent à se produire dans la région de Diffa et Tillaberi (17 et 44 Jours, respectivement) supérieure aux délais visés de 7 jours ; 35% de ces retards sont dus aux pénuries de stock liées dû à la période de soudure entre les 2 projets ECHO. Les autres raisons tiennent à l’accès sécuritaire aux nouvelles zones classées rouges par les autorités militaires (recommandant une escorte pour s'y rendre ou sous interdiction de s’y rendre notamment pour les sites de Tadress, Sakoira et Wallagountou dans la région de Tillaberi) ainsi que les opérations militaires. Quant à la région de Tahoua le dépassement de délais observés (56 jours) nettement supérieur aux 7 jours visés a été causé par des facteurs similaires à ceux de Diffa et Tillabéry. De plus, d’autres facteurs comme le manque de ressources humaines dédiées, la diffusion parfois en retard des rapports des évaluations, la fiabilité de système de points focaux et les blocages occasionnels d’accès aux zones installation des déplacés continuent aussi à influencer sur les délais de réponses pour environ 70%. Néanmoins certaines localités demeurent inaccessibles.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Contre la Faim France, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objective du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les catastrophes naturelles ou bien les épidémies.

    Délais d’intervention

    Le seuil de déclenchement du RRM :

    Dans le cadre des mouvements de populations, le seuil de déclenchement du RRM est fixé à 50 ménages (sauf cas exceptionnels) et se base sur les informations obtenues lors de l’alerte, vérifiées et validées par les partenaires. Si le seuil est inférieur à 50 ménages, une intervention sera considérée sur la base des capacités disponibles.

    Les délais actuels:

    En Janvier et Février 2019 les retards continuent à se produire dans la région de Diffa et Tillaberi (17 et 44 Jours, respectivement) supérieure aux délais visés de 7 jours ; cependant au cours du mois de mars, ces délais ont considérablement diminué avec respectivement (10 et 29 jours) en moyenne entre l’alerte et le début des interventions. Environ 50% de ces retards sont dus aux pénuries de stock liées à la période de soudure entre les 2 projets ECHO et l’insuffisance de kits pour une réponse globale notamment à Diffa avec la recrudescence des attaques des GANE au mois de mars. Les autres raisons tiennent d’une part à la relocalisation des déplacés du site de Tabarey barey (Région de Tillaberi) à cause de leur proximité avec le camp des réfugiés maliens voulue par les autorités et d’autres parts le nombre les déplacés qui n’a pas atteint 50 ménages avant le déclanchement d’une MSA à temps sur le site de Inékar – Ayerou (région de Tillaberi). Quant à la région de Tahoua le dépassement de délais observés (55 jours) sur le site de Guidan Ahmet (département de Madaoua) est nettement supérieur aux 7 jours visés. Ceci a été causé par des facteurs similaires à ceux de Diffa et Tillabéry notamment l’indisponibilité de kits NFI.


    0 0

    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, World Food Programme, Action Contre la Faim France, UN Children's Fund, International Rescue Committee, Government of Niger
    Country: Niger

    Le Mécanisme de Réponse Rapide (RRM) consiste en un réseau d'acteurs capables de réagir rapidement aux urgences humanitaires grâce au pré-positionnement des intrants de secours, à des processus et procédures convenus et aux capacités dédiées. Le RRM fonctionne en complémentarité avec la réponse humanitaire élargie et les structures étatiques, étant intégré dans l’architecture de coordination établie et faisant parti du Plan de Réponse Humanitaire. L’objectif du RRM est de rendre une assistance immédiate de base aux populations affectées par les conflits armés, les catastrophes naturelles ou les épidémies.